Hakone Onsen Trip – what I ate that night

 

Hakone Onsen Trip
A happy new year 2011! (too late to say it!) (^へ^;)
The year of rabbit!!  This rabbit made by potato, and you can eat them all.

I went on a trip to Hakone when I visited Japan this February. Hakone has onsen and I stayed one of the hotels (Ryokan) there. This was my second private trip to Hakone. I had had stayed there a couple of times for my job when I was young.  I chose this hotel because it was reasonable and good advertised food. I felt like this hotel is targeted to women customers and they did a good job.

What is ONSEN?

An onsen (温泉?) is a term for hot springs in the Japanese language, though the term is often used to describe the bathing facilities and inns around the hot springs. As a volcanically active country, Japan has thousands of onsen scattered along its length and breadth. Onsen were traditionally used as public bathing places and today play a central role in directing Japanese domestic tourism.  If you want to read more, read this wiki page.

What is Ryokan and their food?

A ryokan (旅館?) is a type of traditional Japanese inn that originated in the Edo period (1603–1868), when such inns served travelers along Japan’s highways. They typically feature tatami-matted rooms, communal baths, and other public areas where visitors may wear yukata and talk with the owner.

Most ryokan offer dinner and breakfast, which are often included in the price of the room. Most visitors do take their meals at the ryokan, which usually promote themselves on the quality of their food. Meals consist of traditional Japanese cuisine known as kaiseki, which features seasonal and regional specialties. (Kaiseki originally referred to light meals served during a tea ceremony, and today refers to a meal consisting of a number of small, varied dishes.) In order for each dish to be enjoyed at the proper temperature, ryokan stress that guests should be punctual for their meals. For this reason, most ryokan ask guests to confirm the time they want to take their meals.Some ryokan have a communal dining area, but most serve meals in the guests’ rooms. Ryokan which are likely to serve non-Japanese guests may also have a selection of Western food.  If you want to read more, go to this page.

 

 

I will put a bunch of this hotel’s dinners here. This was West meet East kind of dinner. And this was very popular dinner (that is what the hotel said).  I wanted to have a complete Japanese dinner but I didn’t order before I got there, so they decided for me. Well, I am an easy going person, so I said it was OK! (Actually, I am happy if the food is good, kind of person, so I didn’t care. Just feed me!!)

So, those are the dinner pictures! Enjoy!!

hakone trip

 

This is sake and inarizushi. But it is black. Black inarizushi is rare thing; this is this hotel’s signature food. It’s called Chakin inari. If you don’t know Inarizushi, see my Inarizushi page.

hakone trip inarizushi

 

Bad picture, sorry.  It is like a small bag.  There is sushi rice inside.

Hakone Onsen Trip

This is main course. Much small stuff!! THAT IS WHAT I LOVE ABOUT JAPANESE FOOD!!

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

Hakone Onsen Trip

いただきます!!

Hakone Onsen Trip

Cute bunnies!!  This is definetly targeted to women customers!!

Hakone Onsen Trip

DON”T LOOK AT ME!  I WILL EAT YOU!!

The food is good, I expected better.  Because this hotel advertised that they were an award winning hotel for Rakuten travel, which is one of the biggest website companies.   The last picture on the bunny is a pot beef stew.  This was disappointing, I remember.

Hakone Onsen Trip

The bunny tail, so cute!!

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